A dusky, delicate voice brimming with emotion.
— KEXP
Gorgeous orchestral folk-pop
— OPB Music (Jerad Walker)

PRESS


Maiah Wynne is one of those musicians it’s impossible not to like. Down to earth, friendly, and inspiring
— Metiza Magazine
Alarmingly beautiful
— Kill the Music
haunting vocals and ukulele...she’s making a mark in the folk-pop world.
— Sustain Music and Nature
[A Siren’s Song] fills you with wonder, with longing, with appreciation for the natural beauty that we so often overlook — and in doing so makes you want to run out and hug that mysterious ocean world and keep it safe from harm.
— 30A - Tania Braukamper
Maiah Wynne Wings Dress v1 8x10 BLKnWT.jpg
Marvelous
— Boing Boing
Maiah’s lyrics, music and artistry shows maturity and talent beyond her age
— Ukulele Magazine
when you see her perform her song “Fearless Girl,” a #MeToo-era tribute that she sings in a strong, lucid voice while tackling keyboard, electronic drum kit and a bucket bass drum, it’s obvious why she’s a rising star.
— The Missoula Independent
Wynne delivers a cinematic beauty with “Sleep”. It is rich and complex, breathtaking and engrossing, as Wynne’s lithe vocals glide through the beautifully brooding soundscape. As the rhythms throb and the strings sear, Wynne shares a chilling tale about people suffering with chronic sleep disorders. Their world is a living nightmare, where the night haunts their minds. “Get out of my head, get out of my soul”, she lushly sings. This song, too, will haunt you, but you’ll embrace it instead of trying to escape from it. Hopefully, the rest of the world will embrace Wynne and acknowledge her incredible talent.
— Ben Yung, The Revue
DSC_1791[1].jpg
A prolific songwriter...Maiah Wynne is taking the world by tidal wave.
— Socially Sparked News
Haunting vocal tones, like a misty purple sunset filled with cool desert air, combine with an impressive array of instruments—including the mountain dulcimer, thumb piano, and the electric ukulele. The beauty of Ms. Wynne’s tracks is heightened further by her emotional and empathetic storytelling. Follow the butterfly, you won’t be disappointed.
— Seattle Museum of Pop Cultre
Light and Shadows’ reveals the sound of a true artist perfecting their craft.
— Skope Magazine
One of her most striking videos is of her performance inside the tunnel next to the Berkeley Pit. The tunnel glows like a hallway inside the Millennium Falcon. Wynne, wearing a purple dress and black boots, strums a gorgeous Bohemian Honey electric soprano ukulele (the body of which is made from a Bohemian motor oil can) and sings Radiohead’s “Creep.” Who hasn’t seen that song covered a million times? But Wynne’s take on it is pretty-but-raw in a way I’ve never heard before.
— The Missoula Independent
Maiah Wynne is a Gen Xer to watch as she adds her spark to the world.
— Socially Sparked News
At just 21 years old Wynne is already scorching out a path as a rising star of the folk-pop world, but what made us fall for her even more was her drive to use her talents to make a difference.
— 30A
It’s not just established stars and new super-groups that are making us go “Whoa!”, but plenty of newcomers are blowing us away. Take Maiah Wynne, who resides in Missoula, Montana. Her single, “Monster in a Human Suit”, which is from her EP Lights and Shadows, is gorgeous, haunting indie-folk, where every note and lyric penetrates deep into your skin. The allegory and imagery of the song is that of a seasoned creative writer, yet Wynne is only 19-years old. Could she be the next Brandi Carlile? The skies is clearly the limit for this rising folk star.
— The Revue
select Analog Feb 2018 edit3.jpg
emotional and innovative
— Bozeman Magazine
Maiah Wynne is Mystical, Magical, and Making Waves
— Metiza Magazine
Maiah Wynne has a voice that’s both sweet and haunting. Such that if it reached the ear of any sailor, he’d mistake her for a Siren and tie himself to the mast.
— 30A
she’s able to capture the character from a song or idea, whether it’s a blues song or a dark, minimalist pop tune not too dissimilar from Lorde.
— The Missoulian
she’s continued to put herself into the world with a steady, humble confidence.
— The Missoula Independent